Crazy Socks and The Importance of Channeling your “Kidself”

crazy socks

 

I know you’re going to think this is a little weird, but for years I wore crazy socks along with my conventional corporate attire. There I was with my button-up dress shirt, tie and jacket, and just peeking out from beneath the cuff of my conservative dress slacks, there it was. Craziness.

Even when my company went business-casual, my socks were freaky enough to stand out. Bright neon green. Palm trees. Frogs. Architecture. Some were color-blind argyles. Others had decidedly eccentric holiday themes. I was stylin’!

I am otherwise a pretty decent dresser, (“snappy” according to one coworker. I’m still trying to convince myself that he knew what he was talking about but he probably just had really low standards. He was a straight guy after all). In any case, you get the picture. When it comes to dressing, I’d say I get a pretty solid B. But what do I know.

You may be wondering why I would want to wear crazy socks in a corporate environment. To place my career in jeopardy? To call attention to myself? Not at all. People never even noticed them.

I take that back. Our General Counsel often did, even going so far as to point them out to visiting guests. I think he was jealous. Lawyers.

For me, these goofy socks were a reminder that an important part of me, my “kidself”, needed to be present and active in my grown up world.

Because I work in marketing and communications, listening to my kidself is especially important to me.

In my kidself mindset, I find I am more imaginative. I have a bigger vision for what’s possible and I can see more easily how great ideas from other companies and industries can be made to work in my own.

But what if you are in information technology, accounting or ops? Can paying attention to your kidself help you too? I think so. Here’s why.

Openness. When you were a kid, nothing was off the table. I used to love listening to my daughters play when they were really little. They would have assumed some imaginative persona when one of them would say to the other “How ’bout?” followed by some outlandish circumstance. “How ‘bout you’re being chased by a great white shark in a jeep and your leg is in a cast?” or “How ‘bout Louise (our dog) is the king and you have to steal his brownies to save the princess?” There was never a “how ‘bout” that the other didn’t immediately take on. Anything and everything was worth trying.

In your kidself frame of mind, you are less likely to dismiss new ideas simply because they are unfamiliar or don’t conform to the dreaded way-you-have-always-done-it.

Creative Problem Solving. I’m painfully aware that in the grown up world problems and the ways we solve or don’t solve them can have grave consequences. That’s why so many of us dread them. On the other hand your kidself sees a problem not as a threat or an inconvenience, but as a puzzle. Watch a kid play with Legos sometime and you’ll see what I mean.  children-playing-at-home-thumb20446258

By listening to your kidself, you can approach the problem inventively, get help when you need it, and consider out of the box solutions you would never come up with when you’re stressed, afraid or bored.

Better Community. This might be the most important point of all.

When I say community, I mean the way we encourage and enable one another at work, or don’t. This is a big deal. The people we work with, their attitudes and willingness to give and take represent a huge part of our professional experiences. Tapping into your kidself can make your work better and make it better for the people around you.

Or not.

grumpy gif

I had a colleague who was a wonderfully capable technologist. He was a valuable asset and team member. He was also an Eeyore.

If you were a fan of Winnie the Pooh books or movies, you are probably familiar with Eeyore. He was the dour, relentlessly pessimistic donkey who saw only the negative side of things. Eeyore dreaded the future. To him, life is nothing more than a disaster waiting to happen.

We have all worked with or known an Eeyore. They are fun suckers. Worse, they make an already very demanding workplace experience harder. In my experience, Eeyores are often bureaucratic and inflexible. Too preoccupied with process and protocol to innovate or engage.

Well, I encountered this same colleague at a company social event and found him completely transformed! When we met, his usually downcast eyes met mine with a warm smile. He was animated and communicative. I even learned he was a musician and active in the arts. Who was this guy and what had he done with Eeyore?

Away from the pressures at work, he was channeling his kidself, an enthusiastic, attentive and positive person I actually enjoyed being with. Imagine how much more pleasant workdays might have been for him and the people around him if he had allowed even a glimmer of that positive, creative energy to emerge at work.

I don’t want you to think I am being critical. Working in information technology and systems admin (for example) sucks most the time. Day after day you’re working with impatient people, jumping from fire to fire. The risks and responsibilities are enormous and the hours are long. Hell, sometimes it just feels easier just put your head down. But if only for your own sake, you shouldn’t.

Think about your kidself. Pay attention to it. Be intentional about making her or him a part of your life and your work. And if you need help remembering your intention, put on some crazy socks. You’ll be glad you did.

How do you make your kidself a part of your work life? Have you had colleagues who you felt were in touch with their kidself? How did it affect their performance and the company?

 

If you enjoyed this article, I hope you will share it with friends and colleagues. More and more people are reading so I’m encouraged that at least a few of you are getting something valuable here. Your comments are a great way to extend the conversation. I encourage you to get involved and look forward to hearing from you – Michael

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