A Christmas Carol: Mr. Fezziwig’s Lessons for Management and Marketing

250px-Fezziwig_Ball-_Sol_EytingeCharles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” is a much-loved staple of the holiday season, and a personal favorite of mine from one of my favorite authors. Presented for the first time in 1843 to wide acclaim and commercial success, the short novel or one of its many adaptations still entertains millions all over the world over a wide variety of media.

It’s easy to see why. The story’s message of forgiveness, generosity, hope and redemption resonates with people of many backgrounds and traditions. To this day, it possesses life – and business – lessons that are every bit as relevant as they were in Victorian England.

You know the story. Ebenezer Scrooge (among the best names in English literature) is introduced as a bitter miser, insufferable skinflint and cruel, abusive employer. Jacob Marley, Scrooge’s business partner who died seven Christmases ago, visits Scrooge as a tormented ghost to reveal the fate that awaits a terrified but recalcitrant Scrooge.

“I am here tonight to warn you, that you have yet a chance and a hope of escaping my fate. A chance and a hope of my procuring, Ebenezer.”

What follows are visits by three “Spirits”: Christmas past, Christmas present and Christmas yet to come. Each spirit guiding Scrooge through his own experiences and illuminating the experiences of the people whose lives Scrooge touches.

While in the company of the Spirit of Christmas past, Scrooge visits the workplace where he was apprenticed, Mr. Fezziwig’s warehouse, just in time for Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig’s annual Christmas party. What ensues is an evening of joy, laughter, feasting, music and dancing that awakens a long denied aspect of Scrooge’s personality.

As the evening wanes and Scrooge and his fellow apprentice are “pouring out their hearts in praise of Fezziwig”, the spirit provokes Scrooge by saying:

“A small matter to make these silly folks so full of gratitude.”

“Small!” echoed Scrooge.

“Why! Is it not? He has spent but a few pounds of your mortal money: three or four, perhaps. Is that so much that he deserves this praise?”

“It isn’t that”, said Scrooge, heated by the remark, and speaking like his former, not his latter self. “It isn’t that, Spirit. He has the power to render us happy or unhappy; to make our service light of burdensome; a pleasure or a toil. Say that his power lies in words and looks; in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count ‘em up: what then? The happiness he gives is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.”

Upon making this exclamation, Scrooge reflects briefly and regretfully on the mistreatment suffered by his employee, Bob Cratchit, explaining to the inquiring ghost that, “I should like to be able to say a word or two to my clerk just now! That’s all.”

Scrooge’s elegant observation about the power of leaders to positively or negatively affect the lives of the people they employ is timeless. Further, it has profound implications for the experiences of our customers and prospects.

The true beauty in Fezziwig’s leadership, and the way it’s perceived by his employees and neighbors, is his sincerity and consistency. “…His power lies in words and looks; in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count ‘em up: what then? The happiness he gives is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.”

Fezziwig’s leadership is born of high regard for the people he employs, and exhibited in ways too numerous to count. The Christmas party serves as a celebratory accent to relationships that are already rich and rewarding.


Employees who feel valued and respected are happier. They provide better service. They’re more creative and more productive. They work harder, bounce back better and support one another more vigorously.

As a result, your products and services are delivered more enthusiastically. Problems are solved more quickly and the “vibe” your prospects get when considering a relationship with your company is better. It doesn’t take a social scientist or research analyst to figure out how important this could be for your business.

The onus here doesn’t lie exclusively with employers and managers. This positive dynamic exists only when employees, like the young Scrooge, are industrious, competent, collaborative and have a clear understanding of what’s expected of them. They also need to understand and embrace what your company stands for (aka YOUR BRAND). These conditions should be met by most companies’ hiring and training procedures. If they don’t, then you are at a disadvantage out of the gate.

As leaders, we can use Mr. Fezziwig’s example to create an environment where we’re able to depend on the people who bring our brand promises to life.

By setting high expectations, providing the resources to meet those expectations and celebrating great outcomes, you can make your company a place where everybody – employees, neighbors, suppliers, customers and prospects – are all happier. With “words and looks; in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count ‘em up…”. You can can build a culture where “the happiness he is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.”

I’m publishing this week on Tuesday because my ordinary Thursday falls on Christmas day. If you like this or any other of my articles, I hope you will share them with friends and colleagues and consider following my blog. As always, your comments are invaluable to me as I plan for future contributions.

Please accept my best wishes for a warm and wonderful Christmas. I hope you are safe and warm, and surrounded by people and traditions you love. Next week, I’ll be taking a look at what I think 2015 might hold. I hope you’ll tune in.

Where have you been happiest at work? How did leadership contribute to your happiness? Can you think of a business you patronize where people are clearly happy? How does it affect your experience as a customer?


3 tips: Brighten Your Brand Through Strategic Giving

giftYour corporate brand is shaped by everything your company does. More and more, even the smallest details of your company’s behavior are now plainly visible to the people you serve and the people you want to serve.

Brands have always been defined by how a company’s public (customers, clients and prospects) feels about it. The difference for your company today is that you are no longer in the driver’s seat. When it comes to orchestrating the impressions that mold your audiences’ feelings about your company, you now have to share that influence with your customers.

If your company is interested in polishing its brand (and you should be), you should seek to build an authentic relationship with your public. To do that, you need to be acutely aware of how your public regards you. You also need to understand how members of your public can contribute – individually and collectively – to your brand’s positioning.

Beyond what you tell the marketplace with your advertising, websites, publications and through other “official” channels, how your public feels about your company can be profoundly influenced by your company’s behavior as a corporate citizen. For this reason, the causes and charities you give to should be considered as deliberately as any business strategy.

Listed below are three tips to help you develop a cohesive philanthropic strategy that aligns with your brand, communicates your values and integrates seamlessly with your other branding activities.

planGive with Purpose

It’s easy to approach philanthropy on an ad-hoc basis, merely reacting to requests from nonprofits and employees. Most companies get more requests for donations than they could ever possibly fund. So too often, the result is a lot of smaller gifts spread across a large swath of charitable causes and services with no intuitive link to your brand.

Instead, think about what you want to accomplish as a donor. What conditions in your community do you want to see improved, and how can you be a legitimate force for positive change?

I suggest identifying 3 or 4 areas where you want to focus your giving. At one financial services company where I was engaged, our overriding giving mission was to improve the prospects for financial self-reliance among people in the communities where we operated. For us, that meant focusing our gifts on education, particularly to improve financial literacy, and human services to support people and families in transition.

Please note that having a “giving mission” doesn’t preclude occasional gifts to nonprofits that don’t fit in the category(s) you’re focused on. Your budget should have room to support special requests and local or business-specific giving opportunities.

authorityLeverage Your Authority

As a donor and corporate citizen, your philanthropic activities should align with your company’s business mission and expertise – areas where you have a uniquely well-informed perspective on relevant issues and their solutions.

Nike provides a perfect example. The global athletic shoe and apparel company gives generously to fitness related programs all over the world. The connection between what the company does and the causes it supports is clear and common sense. Importantly, it also serves an important and widely recognized public health concern: improved health through improved fitness.

Your donations should honestly reflect your company’s wisdom and values. They should also avoid controversy. Unless you are known for taking bold stands on divisive issues, don’t consider causes that might inflame of alienate your public.

volunteersDon’t Just Write a Check

Get your employees and your customers involved. Support and incentivize your employees with paid volunteer time. Share good news about the accomplishments you are helping to fund and implement.

Getting your people involved with the causes your company cares about can make a big difference in their engagement. Employees who are invested in what your company stands for are much better brand ambassadors than employees who simply know what your company does. The same goes for customers.

Look for ways to partner with the nonprofits you support. Yoplait Yogurt has done an exceptional job in support of the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Through philanthropy and cause related marketing, Yoplait has brought heightened awareness to a vitally important problem. At the same time, they have reinforced their brand positioning as a company dedicated to improved health for women and their families.

In this season of giving, I hope your company is in a position to give generously to the causes you and your constituents care about. By giving strategically, with purpose, intention and inclusion, you can really make a difference. The fact that doing so can also brighten your brand is, well, icing on the Christmas cake.

What companies do you admire or patronize because of their charitable activities? Are there certain companies who do a particularly good job of integrating their business and charitable activities? How does your company use its charitable activities to help distinguish itself in the marketplace?

5 Steps to Supercharge Your Financial Services Social Media Strategy

social media imageWhen I began marketing financial services, social wasn’t on the media landscape. In those days, not that long ago, we relied on traditional media, some digital (search & email), public relations and promotions to attract the attention of the people we wanted to serve.

The marketers who succeeded in that environment did masterful jobs understanding where to find their prospective customers and crafting messages that moved them.

They weighed the merits of a growing list of media channels and allocated their budgets in ways they hoped would achieve a measurable return on investment. The addition of social media has made things more complicated. It has also made them better.

What’s cool about social media is its ability to supercharge all the great marketing you are already doing. No matter how you go about marketing your company or brand, social media can amplify and extend the impact.

Whether you are already participating in social media or making plans to start, these five steps will help make your social strategy a success, with outcomes your CEO and CFO will like just as much as you do.


  1. Prepare an editorial calendar: Think about your social media strategy as a narrative arc that extends through the next 12-18 months, and tell a story you believe will matter to your clients. If you are active on multiple platforms, such as LinkedIn and Facebook, it’s critical to remember that each demands its own style and content. Your social strategy should complement and reinforce your overall marketing strategy.document
  2. Upgrade your content: Whether you are writing and publishing your own, curating the content from other sources, or a combination of both, make sure it is consistent with your brand, your strategy and meets your highest standards for quality and integrity. If you are empowering the field – your advisors, bankers, analysts and so forth – work with them to find or create content that is suited to their business and their audience.barchart
  3. Be fanatical about analytics: Watch your results (likes, shares, comments, click-throughs) closely and be prepared to make adjustments when things go well and… well… not so well.magnifying glass
  4. Invest in a social media compliance provider: Most companies who are active in social media have already contracted with a company like Socialware or Hearsay Social to help surveil, moderate, approve and archive social media content. The SEC and FINRA pay close attention to member firms’ activity in digital media. The good news is that with these tools you can manage the risk!being social image
  5. Most important of all, BE SOCIAL: Too many firms in the financial services industry treat social media the same way they do more traditional media. This is not a place to hawk product. Listen to what your audience is saying, explicitly or through their behavior, and respond. Social is where you build and fortify relationships and trust. Deliver content that people value. Deliver it repeatedly and consistently, and you will earn the opportunity to ask them for something.

This is an exciting time to be in the financial services industry. By embracing digital media overall, and social media specifically, financial services companies and professionals can be visible and relevant in ways other media simply can’t match. Stick to these steps, and you’ll be on the right track, nurturing existing relationships and creating opportunities for new ones. Now…go get ‘em.

Does your broker, wealth manager or bank do a good job interacting with you on social media? What companies in any industry do an exceptional job? What kind of content would you be interested in seeing from them?

My December To-Do List. Gettin’ Ready to Nail it in 2015!

Christmas lightsI probably chose the worst possible time of the year to launch my new business. Who on earth is even thinking about new marketing initiatives during the holidays? With year-end wrap ups looming, budgets, planning, vacations and so on, the odds that someone would actually make a decision to hire outside marketing help and put them to work are, roughly speaking, nil. Nada. Zipporino.

So I decided to make the most of what is likely to be some pretty serious downtime to make sure that when 2015 rolls around and people are more focused on business and marketing again, I’m ready and more able than ever to make a difference for them.

So, here is my December to-do list. It’s possible that some of the things I’m thinking about would be helpful to you too, either at work or just in general. If so, grab an egg nog, put on the Michael Buble’ and join me!


Get sharp on social media.

I have known for quite a while that marketers and their companies simply cannot ignore social media. One glaringly obvious reason is that OUR CUSTOMERS AND PROSPECTS ARE THERE. But of course there are tons of good reasons… better targeting, better user engagement, scalability, cost-efficient lead generation, increased sales, more profits.

Social Media as a category is a moving target. I have to be vigilant to remain relevant. You do too, because one way or another Social is good for your business.

I have bought or borrowed several books on the topic, like Gary Vaynerchuk’s “Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook”. I have joined a couple of meet-up groups that specialize in social media marketing, and I’m paying much more attention to what my daughters are doing, like NOT being on Facebook and spending more time on Instagram, Reddit, Pinterest and Tumblr. My goal by January 1 is to have a thorough grasp on the practical implications for all new media, for myself, my business and for my clients.

Write, Design, Develop and Launch a new website.

The website you are on right now, www.michaellmorrison.com, is really nothing more than a blog. For it to become a legitimate, business building asset for my consulting company, it needs to speak directly to the financial services company executives I want to help with messaging and solutions they care about. My marketing materials and proposals need to resonate too.

Here’s how serious I think this is… I even shot a video with the help of some old friends (and Emmy Award winners, I might add) when I was in Montana for Thanksgiving last week. Why? Video improves search and keeps visitors on your site longer. I’ll be using mine to help drive lead generation, because I need to know my site does more than just look good. You should know that too.

I intend to keep blogging about broader marketing, communications, and business & leadership issues, but starting in January, this site will have a much larger scope. If things go according to plan, it will also see a significant jump in traffic. All good things!


Hone my pitch.

I’m positioning Michael L Morrison Marketing as an outsourced Chief Marketing Officer, with competencies and relationships to solve any marketing and communications problem my clients might have. But I want to be sure this isn’t too broad for my prospects to process.

There are consultants out there with a narrow focus on one or two disciplines, like video production or media training. For companies with a very specific problem to solve, it’s easy to decide if these consultants fit the bill. These are just two of the many services my firm provides,

I personally think offering a one-stop-shop for all marketing and communications challenges is a good idea, particularly given my strategic, integrated approach – but I’m going to do some market research to see what kind of positioning and messaging really resonates with executives in the financial services biz.

Every company should be constantly evaluating their messaging and positioning. Remember, it’s not what you have to say that matters, it’s what your customers and prospects are prepared to hear and act upon.

That’s my December. Of course I will also make time for fun holiday stuff. Our daughters and Jake (our older daughter’s fiancé) will all be here. We’re thrilled to have them close by whenever we can, so I’ll be sure to make plenty of time to enjoy their company. Maybe I can get them to walk me through Tumblr! Whatever your plans are, I hope you have a warm and rewarding holiday season and that 2015 is your best year yet!


What are your year-end plans? What are you expectations for 2015 and what are you doing now to make them a reality?